The 2007 caldera collapse at Piton de la Fournaise: new insights from multi-temporal structure-from-motion

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Allan Derrien
Aline Peltier
Nicolas Villeneuve
Thomas Staudacher

Abstract

We produced new multi-temporal Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of the April 2007 summit collapse at Piton de la Fournaise from previously unused aerial photographs. This dataset revealed the precise temporal evolution of collapsed volume and caldera morphological changes. Four days after the onset of an eruption at an unusually low elevation, the summit started to collapse (20:48 UTC April 5th). During the first 30 hours, collapsing was relatively fast (840 ms-1 average), and continued for at least the following 12 days, at a slower rate (46 ms-1 average). On April 19th, the collapse reached 96% of its final volume, while the remaining 4% were probably attained by May 1st (end of lava emission at the vent). The post-collapse hydrothermal activity in the caldera is closely associated with the main ring faults evidenced as active during the collapse, which are now preferential paths for fluids to reach the surface.

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How to Cite
Derrien, A., Peltier, A., Villeneuve, N. and Staudacher, T. (2020) “The 2007 caldera collapse at Piton de la Fournaise: new insights from multi-temporal structure-from-motion”, Volcanica, 3(1), pp. 55-65. doi: 10.30909/vol.03.01.5565.
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Author Biography

Allan Derrien, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris

3rd year PhD Student

Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris - Observatoire Volcanologique du Piton de la Fournaise

Study of recent active volcanism on Piton de la Fournaise. 1/ Link spatial distribution of eruptive cycles with long-term magma input rates from edifice-wide 4D mapping. 2/ Investigate seismic response to the evolution of active vents and lava fields. 3/ Learn best practises and crisis response at the Observatory